Rosh Hashanah (Hebrew: ראש השנה), (literally "head of the year"), is the Jewish New Year. It is the first of the High Holidays or Yamim Noraim ("Days of Awe"), celebrated ten days before Yom Kippur. Rosh Hashanah is observed on the first two days of Tishrei, the seventh month of the Hebrew calendar. It is described in the Torah as יום תרועה (Yom Teru'ah, a day of sounding [the Shofar]).

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List of Dates

Rosh Hashana begins in the Diaspora on:

Recommended Books

Rosh Hashanah Readings: Inspiration, Information And Contemplation
Rosh Hashanah Readings
by Rabbi Dov Peretz Elkins
This Is Real and You Are Completely Unprepared: The Days of Awe as a Journey of Transformation
This Is Real and You Are Completely Unprepared
by Rabbi Alan Lew
The Jewish Calendar 2013
The Jewish Calendar 2013
Entering the High Holy Days: A Guide to Origins, Themes, and Prayers
Entering the High Holy Days
by Rabbi Reuven Hammer

Rosh Hashana - ראש השנה

Rosh Hashana I - ראש השנה יום א׳

Torah Portion: Genesis 21:1 - 21:34 & Numbers 29:1 - 29:6

1: Genesis 21:1-4
2: Genesis 21:5-12
3: Genesis 21:13-21
4: Genesis 21:22-27
5: Genesis 21:28-34
maf: Numbers 29:1-6 (6 p'sukim)

Haftarah: I Samuel 1:1 - 2:10

Rosh Hashana I (on Shabbat) - ראש השנה יום א׳ (בשבת)

Torah Portion: Genesis 21:1 - 21:34 & Numbers 29:1 - 29:6

1: Genesis 21:1-4
2: Genesis 21:5-8
3: Genesis 21:9-12
4: Genesis 21:13-17
5: Genesis 21:18-21
6: Genesis 21:22-27
7: Genesis 21:28-34
maf: Numbers 29:1-6 (6 p'sukim)

Haftarah: I Samuel 1:1 - 2:10

Rosh Hashana II - ראש השנה יום ב׳

Torah Portion: Genesis 22:1 - 22:24 & Numbers 29:1 - 29:6

1: Genesis 22:1-3
2: Genesis 22:4-8
3: Genesis 22:9-14
4: Genesis 22:15-19
5: Genesis 22:20-24
maf: Numbers 29:1-6 (6 p'sukim)

Haftarah: Jeremiah 31:1 - 31:19

References

The Jewish Holidays: A Guide & Commentary
Rabbi Michael Strassfeld
"Rosh Hashanah" in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia
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